SOAL 15
SOAL 29: The Love of Leading with Your Soul
SOAL 29: The Love of Leading with Your Soul

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Mr. Graham grew up during the segregation era and knows what it’s like to be treated unequal and like a second-class citizen. This time in his life is what drove him to turn things around and discover his purpose. Stedman now teaches people all around the world nine steps of success and helps them understand and develop their own identity! It’s not only about self-awareness, but creating a vision, executing it, and never quitting. Struggles will come, but if you’re passionate about something enough, you will sustain it. It’s not how the world defines you. It’s only how you define yourself that really matters.

Love is the center of everything.

If you don’t know where you’re going, then you’re not going to be able to set goals.

You overcome the obstacles because you have a belief in yourself.

You keep starting over and keep starting over until you actually learn from your failures, and you start to create success in your life.

 It’s only how you define yourself that really matters.

You’ll Learn

  • Knowing who you are and understanding your identity, is a foundation for growth, development, and also learning.
  • Don’t let the world define you! Focus on defining yourself.
  • The number one mantra is, don’t quit!
  • Don’t do anything without passion.

Resources

Transcript

Eileen:

Hello, and welcome to the Soul of a Leader podcast, where we ignite soulful conversations with leaders. In today’s episode, Dr. Alicia and Dr. Eileen sit with Mr. Stedman Graham to discuss the love of leading with your soul.

 

Alicia:

Hello. Welcome to Soul of a Leader. In today’s episode, we have Mr. Stedman Graham. We are here to talk about leadership, something that you know a lot about. And I don’t have to do and read a long bio on Mr. Graham. I’ve known you half of my life, literally. I’m in my mid-fifties, so I don’t want to tell the whole age, but I’m certainly grateful to have you on Soul of a Leader to talk about leadership. So welcome to the show.

 

Stedman:

Well, it’s my pleasure, Dr. Straughter. I am so happy. You have worked so hard throughout the years to earn that degree. And I’ve seen you teach at universities, and you ran Athletes Against Drugs, and you just sit a superb job there. You’re an extraordinary person. And I tell you, if anybody if you’re in the foxhole, call Alicia Straughter. Okay? Dr. Alicia Straughter.

 

Alicia:

I learned from the best. I certainly appreciate everything. I know I tell you every time we talk and catch up, and I was like, thank you for the 20 years because it made a huge impact on my life. I would not be doing what I’m doing today without being around you. So it was forever loved. I mean, we’re like family anyway.

 

Stedman:

No question. No question.

 

Eileen:

Thank you so much for sharing that about Alicia. Alicia and I have been friends for over 20 years, and I agree with you. If I’m ever in a foxhole, I want her right next to me. Our friendship, I cherish. And it’s just, I can’t say enough about her. So thank you.

 

Stedman:

Thanks for having me.

 

Eileen:

Our first question is, what and who ignited your leadership style and passion around leading with identity?

 

Stedman:

Well, for me, I think it was the search for equality for me. I grew up in all-black towns, surrounded by the white county where they said nothing ever good comes out of Whitesboro. And I grew up with a race face consciousness, which means that race was at the center and the core of my consciousness. So it was always in my face, and I was always around it. And I grew up during segregation as a small, young man. And so I dealt with water fountains being separate, movies being separate, not necessarily where I grew up, but in the south where I would travel to see my grandparents. And I went to a segregated school for a number of years. So I always wondered why in the world do I have to feel like I’m unequal? Why do I have to feel like I’m a second class citizen?

 

Stedman:

And so that was really the driving force in my life to be able to do the work that I do and to really figure out what is the process for success? How does it work? What does it look like? And I was always searching for that. So I ended up teaching what I learned and teaching other people around the world, who you are, which is really the center of your existence. Who you are, knowing who you are, and understanding your identity, I discovered was a foundation for growth, development, and also learning. So I’m just blessed and feel very privileged that I can even teach this work, and I can even experience it in my own life and be able to kind of unpeel the onion in my heart and soul and get down to the things that really matter. I don’t take it lightly, and it’s a gift for me.

 

Alicia:

One of the things I know from being around you, you had the nine steps to success and then finding out who you are. What are some of those steps that we can kind of talk about that we kind of need today, dealing with a lot of racial tension and systemic racism? Oftentimes people don’t know their identity, or they don’t know who they really are, and so it’s hard for them to lead. So let’s talk a little bit about some of those steps that you have.

 

Stedman:

Yeah. Alicia, thank you so much for that. It’s so important to be able to understand that there is a process for success. And you get this because you’re in business, and you’ve worked very hard, and you understand that not everybody understands the process for success-

 

Alicia:

Absolutely.

 

Stedman:

… and how it works. And certainly, if you’re able to understand the capitalistic system in the business, and you can apply that to your own life, that’s a plus. And so the most important step is understanding what your purpose is and what your passion is and what you’re passionate about and what kind of work do you love to do and what makes you happy.

 

Stedman:

And so, the core of everything that it’s great or everything that is good is the core of it is based on the most powerful word in the world, which is, John 12 says, God is love. And so love is the center of everything. And if you can build your life around love and build your life around who you are, and then be able to organize everything you love and consistently work on that, you begin to build an identity for yourself. And you begin to understand the value of information and how to take that information and make it relevant to your development. So it’s one thing to learn. It’s another thing to apply the information so that you actually grow and move out of this fixed mindset.

 

Stedman:

So the fixed mindset, and we’re still talking about step one, the fixed mindset is like, man, you get stuck in that, you pretty much become a victim, and you are focusing on how the world defines you, as opposed to how you define yourself. You’re doing the same thing over and over every single day. You’re pretty much not going anywhere. And you really don’t understand the value of information and knowledge and education and how it works.

 

Stedman:

So I was that person. You’re not thinking. You’re not a thinking human being. You don’t really think. You are stuck in your history. You’re stuck in, what your parents taught you, and pretty much that may be outdated, especially today when you have technology changing everything, and pretty much everybody’s left behind.

 

Stedman:

So the first step is understanding what you love and what your purpose is and what your identity. It’s called, check your ID. And that’s part of the nine-step success process. That’s the first step.

 

Stedman:

The second step is vision. And then just being able to not only understand who you are but where you’re going. And if you don’t know where you’re going, then you’re not going to be able to set goals. You’re not going to create habits. You’re not going to develop a routine. You’re not going to even be able to measure your progress because you’re really not going anywhere. And that really represents about 6.9 billion people who are basically just working every day, trying to do the best they can, trying to take care of their families, but really don’t have the extra information to create self-awareness and independence for themselves. You all thought that from having to work hard every day to develop independence and freedom for yourself and how hard that is. That’s a very difficult process.

 

Stedman:

So where are you right now? Okay. Who are you right now?

 

Alicia:

Absolutely.

 

Stedman:

You know what that looks like. Where you’re going is the challenge. And can you keep developing a process of continuous improvement? Can you keep creating a vision over and over to get beyond the vision that you just had? After you’ve achieved that vision, now can you set another vision? Can you develop another opportunity? Can you create another goal for yourself that’s bigger than the goal that you just had?

 

Stedman:

So I think those two steps, and the rest of it, the third step, I just do three, is planning. So those three steps are like, man, I know who I am. I’m motivated every single day. I’ve got willpower. I’m able to create independence for myself in terms of what I like and what I love. Important, because that’s your passion. That’s your motivation.

 

Stedman:

Your second step is to visualize who you want to become, not who you are, but who can you become, and then set up a process for doing that.

 

Stedman:

And the third one is, none of this means anything unless you’re able to execute. So are you able to execute? Now, that’s tough, being able to make it happen. A lot of talks, people talk a lot.

 

Alicia:

Right. Yep.

 

Stedman:

Can they actually get it done?

 

Alicia:

Yeah. And that’s the key. Can they actually get it done?

 

Stedman:

Can they actually get it done? I know you. I know what you do. Okay. You get it done. All right. You don’t be talking around. You don’t’ be messing around. You’re not playing. Don’t be talking about something if you don’t want to get it done.

 

Alicia:

Exactly. You know how we roll. We were, look, let’s make it happen.

 

Stedman:

Listen, I know how you roll.

 

Eileen:

The one question I have is the execution. A lot of people will write it down, write the plan, execute it. How do you suggest that they keep themselves accountable for it? And make a promise to themselves and be accountable to deliver? And what energy can create that?

 

Stedman:

Well, that’s part of the plan. The plan is, are you’ve got to have a structure for how you get it done. And you got to be able to break it down into small steps. The big thing about success is that, first of all, it takes a long time to create the success you want. You can measure that in different ways, but certainly, the process of success is the same. It’s a small step process. People talk about, I want to do a big deal. I want to do… I want to get rich. I want to create a lot of wealth. It takes a long time to do that because there are no big deals.

 

Alicia:

Right.

 

Stedman:

What big deal is [inaudible 00:11:29].

 

Alicia:

Right.

 

Stedman:

Are they just going to show up? And you going to know how to do them? It’s a series, and you don’t get to a big deal until you do a series of small things that turn eventually into a big deal.

 

Alicia:

Absolutely.

 

Stedman:

And so you’re working to figure out, okay, I want to create this or get this or make a certain amount of money, or I want to achieve this goal. It takes a lot of work just to get that done. And then you got to repeat that same thing over and over. And then you got to develop a model, and then you got to develop sustainability, and then you got to be tied to what you really good at. Then you got to be motivated. You got to get up and do it over and over. There’s a process for it. And if you don’t have the discipline, if you don’t want it, if you don’t have the willpower, then it is going to show up.

 

Alicia:

And one of the other things I think too, people, with society now, everybody wants it quick. Everybody wants this fame. Everybody wants to be something that they’re not. And I like social media for what it’s worth. And you have to make it valuable for what you need, but it also has its negative points of everybody saying that they can become this celebrity just like that. And just like you said, it’s a process to it. It’s a commitment. I mean, it’s a lot of work. It’s a lot of work to take a vision and to have a plan and to execute that. And it’s more than a notion.

 

Stedman:

Well, it’s whatever you put into it, you get out of it.

 

Alicia:

Absolutely.

 

Stedman:

So if you don’t lay out the structure for it, if you’re not passionate about it, if it’s, there’s a lot of plan in your own mind, I’ll call it. You’re a legend in your own mind, but to actually create something, and I’ll tell you the quickest way to be able to figure it out if you’re actually creating any value is to ask yourself, does somebody pay for this? Who’s paying?

 

Eileen:

Right.

 

Alicia:

Right.

 

Eileen:

Right.

 

Stedman:

Okay. So if you can’t monetize it and then do it over and over and over again, where you’re making, checks are coming in over a long period of time, and you’re consistent with that, what do you have? So if nobody’s paying you for it, and you’re not creating something of value, where you can consistently get paid for it, you’re fooling yourself.

 

Stedman:

So it takes a long time to create that because you’ve got a thing called the American free enterprise system. You’ve got capitalism. You’ve got… You know, people, the last thing they want to give you is money. That’s the last thing they’re going to give you. They’ll talk to a whole bunch of other stuff, but the last thing they’re going to give you, they don’t want to reach in their pocket and pay you. And so if you can do that with an idea, if you come up with an idea and a thought, and everything comes, starts with an idea, if you can organize that idea if you can develop it if you can use a small step process if you have a vision for it if you have a plan for it if you can execute it if you can develop it, and you can build it, and then you can monetize it. And then you can take social media and use social media as a way to scale it. So you can develop it anywhere in the whole global marketplace, you have done something. Do you know how long it takes to learn that?

 

Alicia:

A long time.

 

Stedman:

It takes a long time to learn it.

 

Alicia:

It’s a long time.

 

Stedman:

Right.

 

Eileen:

And it takes making errors and some failures too, correct? To come over it.

 

Alicia:

Yeah.

 

Stedman:

It tastes going broke. It takes not knowing what’s she going to do. It takes having to have patience. You may not be able to pay rent. Folks are knocking on your door. You have to go through all of that to know how to deal with those situations when they come up. And that’s not an easy thing. Sometimes you’re making payroll. I’ve been there. Alicia knows. I’ve been all of it.

 

Alicia:

We have been… The struggle was real.

 

Stedman:

The struggle was real. And we survived through all of it.

 

Alicia:

Yes, we did.

 

Stedman:

Because we believed in what we were doing. And that’s sometimes the only thing that you have in your ability to believe in what you’re doing. So you overcome the obstacles because you have a belief in yourself. You’re not going to give up. And you say to the folks, y’all going to have to take me out here. And you’re going to have to get a wheelbarrow and just put me in and then roll me out because I’m not leaving until somebody kicks me out.

 

Alicia:

Right.

 

Stedman:

And then what happens, because you have the spirit of determination and perseverance, things turn over because you’re not quitting. You don’t quit. So the key is, is to, one of the keys in business, if you’re going to be in business, or you’re going to be an entrepreneur, are you really focused on whatever you’re building? You really focused on that. You want to achieve the success around that, around your talents and skills. The number issue, the number one program, or the number one mantra is, don’t quit.

 

Alicia:

Yes.

 

Eileen:

Yep.

 

Stedman:

And if you quit, you didn’t want it anyway.

 

Alicia:

Exactly. You don’t want to work for it.

 

Stedman:

You don’t want to work for it. So it’s called work. It’s called vision. It’s called planning. It’s called an organization. It’s called sacrifice. It’s called willpower. It’s called drive. It’s called determination. It’s called overcoming fear. It’s called building relationships. It’s called networking. And it’s called all of those things. That’s why there are so many things involved in it to create a program that you can sustain over long periods of time, where you can be proud of consistently, sometimes earn a living from it, that most people don’t even want to deal with one of those things, much less 35 at the same time.

 

Alicia:

One of those will just take somebody out who just don’t have-

 

Stedman:

Just one.

 

Alicia:

One.

 

Stedman:

So it says a lot about who you are, just to do a podcast, just doing this podcast right now. I mean the work it takes just doing this and doing it well.

 

Alicia:

Yes.

 

Stedman:

And then sustaining it, because you’ve got to sustain it, and you’ve got to put the time into it. And that you’ve got to lay out the time. Something may come up where you don’t listen. Well, I can’t do that right now. I’m doing this podcast, and I’ve got folks involved, and so we have to maintain the schedule, and we have to be consistent. And the key is, is that, do you have the drive and the motivation, and do you have the passion? That’s why passion is so important. Don’t do anything without passion.

 

Alicia:

Absolutely.

 

Stedman:

Because if you don’t have the passion for it, you’re not going to sustain it. You’re going to get tired, and you’ve going to make excuses, and you’re going to be a victim to the circumstances. And you’re going to start saying, I can’t do this, and this got in my way, and my mother asked me to do something. My sister and I got to do this, and all that. Forget all of that.

 

Alicia:

Right. All the excuses, they come up. Yeah.

 

Stedman:

All the excuses. You got to be committed. You got to make a commitment to what you believe in. And so that’s where the passion and also is where the motivation comes in.

 

Eileen:

And with that, the word resilience really comes to me on bouncing back and driving behind that passion. And even with our podcast, we have a passion. We definitely do. And we have a message that we feel like needs to get out there more than ever. But the resilience behind starting any business, could you share what you think about resilience?

 

Stedman:

Yeah. The resilience comes, when things are not going well. Everybody wants to be big-time when things are going great.

 

Alicia:

Yes.

 

Stedman:

Man. But when things are… You can tell the difference between the winners and losers because winners do what losers won’t do.

 

Alicia:

Yes.

 

Stedman:

And that is they sometimes don’t get to sleep, but they don’t get to sleep at night sometimes. They’re staying up, or they’re working all night long, or whatever it takes to get it done. So the resilience comes in when you are up against the wall. You don’t know what to do. You don’t even have the answers. And sometimes you’re just praying, God, I’m going to just… You have to just if you don’t have some faith, you’re pretty much in bad shape.

 

Alicia:

Right. We are going to agree with you on that one.

 

Stedman:

What I want to do is, I can’t handle this right now. I’m going to turn it over to you. And I’ve done that lots of times where I said, you know what? I’m just going to turn it over to you and let you handle it. Okay. I’m going to be trying to be bigger than you. Turn it over to him. It gets handled. For some reason, when they say surrender all, you surrender all, and sometimes you have to surrender all, right? Then what happens, you surrender all, and what happens, and things start to change. And so that becomes part of the strategy for, or the opportunity to test your resilience, to see if you’re supposed to be there in the first place.

 

Alicia:

Absolutely.

 

Stedman:

IF you’re not supposed to be there, you won’t be there. Tomorrow, you’ll be gone, and you’ll be closed down. And you were just trying it out, but really you don’t really own that. You don’t own that business. You don’t own that intellectual property as you’re talking about. You don’t own the speaking. You don’t own any of that because if you close down if you are not in business anymore if you have to change, you’re still going to go back to doing what you were doing.

 

Eileen:

Right.

 

Stedman:

That’s called skills. You still got the skills and passion as a part of your purpose to do that regardless of what the situations are, regardless of what happens. You just start over, and you keep starting over and keep starting over until you actually learn from your failures, and you start to create success in your life.

 

Alicia:

And I think that’s the biggest learning moment is some of your failures. I have often told people because the pandemic is here. And I said, when I was at Athletes Against Drugs as a managing director, I went through 9/11. I went through Katrina and the tsunami when there was a crash with Wall Street and all. I mean, that was like four big, huge worldwide issues.

 

Stedman:

Huge.

 

Alicia:

Huge. And it was a tremendous impact on the organization receiving donations and help. And so one of the things I, hear you saying-

 

Stedman:

But Alicia, it was preparing you for getting those big checks you get it right now.

 

Alicia:

Absolutely.

 

Stedman:

Okay. Let’s not talk about the big checks you’re getting right now. Okay. So whatever you had to go through, right now, you can get the big checks. And it’s going right to you.

 

Alicia:

Exactly. People don’t see all of that and wonder, well, how did you make it? Because I already know you, so you experienced it.

 

Stedman:

You’re already been through the struggle.

 

Alicia:

You’ve been through the struggle. You just about know what to do at this point when you’ve been through four major, and this is major too, so it’s not discounting it. Same thing, but at a different time. And so that’s where the perseverance comes is because just like you said, it’s going to really tell who you are. You’re either in it because you love it, or you just end it because you think you just want to get famous.

 

Stedman:

When it starts to shake a little bit, you already, wait a minute, hold it, hold it. You’re not going to wait until there’s an earthquake. You’re going to start to put some stuff [inaudible 00:23:43], and you’re going to start to really focus, okay, let me prepare because I see it coming down the pipe. Now you can do it in a different way, or it comes, it happens, and then you’re able to maneuver it in a different way. So that’s part of the learning experience. And that’s what, you can’t buy that. And you can’t go to school for that. You got to go through that.

 

Alicia:

Absolutely. You can’t buy that. Yeah. You have to go through that. There are certain things you can learn, and I’m all for education. We all are. But there are certain things at school you’re just not going to know what to do.

 

Stedman:

Yeah. So you have to learn that, and you have to keep planning and organizing and building. And so that’s what the nine steps… The nine steps, it’s a systemic process that teaches you how to customize your own system for success. Because the system for success out here now is just average. And it’s just changing and changing and changing. And if you get into this system today, then you’re not going to be able to self-actualize who you are, because it’s not set up for who you are. It’s only set up for you to actually work and build somebody else’s opportunity. It’s not set up for you. So until you, and this is your economy. In the 21st century, it says, if you don’t focus on you, and we know this from the pandemic, where everybody’s stuck, and you got 15 million people unemployed, if you don’t set up something for you, the marketplace may fall flat on his face, and you won’t know how to get to the next level.

 

Alicia:

Absolutely.

 

Stedman:

And so you can have a better opportunity than today because we have access to technology. It’s not until you understand how to apply that technology to who you are, to your talents, and to your skills, that you actually can use it. Everybody else is using it for entertainment, for buying stuff, for all of that. It’s not serving you well until you understand the value of that knowledge and information and how to extract that information. And it gives you, it has so much information.

 

Stedman:

I do so much research. I don’t need to hire a researcher. I get a lot of news. I got it right here. I’m walking around with it.

 

Alicia:

Right.

 

Stedman:

So it will answer almost every question and give me the information I need to make a decision. So I’m applying that information to my everyday life so I can improve the mousetrap, so I can improve my business, so I can improve my work. And that is such a gift for me.

 

Eileen:

Well, many leaders that we’ve talked to, and what you just explained, is being resourceful, finding that information, as you said, now it’s right there on the phone.

 

Stedman:

Well, suppose you were looking for information, you didn’t know what you were looking for. So that’s what the majority of people are doing. They’re just searching the web, looking for what? Information that says what? So I don’t even know how to use the information. It’s not even relevant to my development. So the idea of knowing your identity and knowing who you are and knowing how to start allows you to create a learning process, so you can begin to understand the value of knowledge and information because everything is about content. When they say content is king, they mean it. They got a whole educational system set up around content. They’ve got colleges and universities set up around content.

 

Alicia:

Absolutely.

 

Stedman:

And depending on the value of the content will determine whether you go to Harvard, or you go to Yale, or you go to an Ivy League school, or you go to just a regular school that is not as robust or not as valuable as a school that’s concentrated on the best information in the world. And if you get access to it, you become part of the 1%, and you’re hanging around people who are smarter and stronger and faster, and you get to develop relationships with them because you’re not operating at a lower level, because your content is dumbed down, or you don’t have the information to know how to put the pieces of the puzzle together.

 

Stedman:

So if you don’t search for that information yourself, if you don’t know where to go to get the right information… School today, you can come out of Harvard or Yale and still not be able to find a job, but at least you’re qualified and understand and have the discipline and the study skills to be exposed to whatever you need to exposed to so that you will at least have the ability to do it.

 

Stedman:

But today, with technology, anybody has the ability to create self-directed learning and lifelong learning and to be able to find a way to improve their acumen and their knowledge base and their talents and their skills, so that they can achieve success based on becoming better than the average person, becoming stronger than the average person, becoming wiser than the average person, becoming more skilled than the average person. Because they’re paying you today for your skills-

 

Alicia:

Yes, they are.

 

Stedman:

… and your talents and your abilities. Now they’re not paying you to show up with a degree just because you have a degree. The question is, are you going to ask them, Alicia, what can you do?

 

Alicia:

Right.

 

Stedman:

Tell me what you can do-

 

Alicia:

I want to know what you can do.

 

Stedman:

… that’s going to be helpful to me in this office. And Eileen, you’re going to say the thing. Tell me, what are your skills? What are your talents? What are your abilities? Before I pay you, what can you actually help me do?

 

Eileen:

It doesn’t matter if you have a Ph.D. after your name, they still ask us too, right?

 

Stedman:

Yeah. Tell me what you’re doing? What’s your brand value? What value do you bring to the table? So if you’re suffering from low self-esteem, a lack of confidence in yourself, and you have no communication skills and very little communication skills, you don’t know how to be nice to people, you don’t know how to carry yourself, you don’t eat correctly when we take you to dinner, you sit over there quiet. What’s wrong with you? If they got to ask you, what’s wrong with you, you’re out.

 

Stedman:

So you got to learn all of that. All of that’s a part of, if you’re in business, dealing with people, you got to learn how to build relationships with folks and make people feel good about themselves and do all of that. That’s part of the overall process for success. It’s not just book learning. It’s not just, you work hard. It’s all of those things that make up who you are.

 

Alicia:

We are coming close to an end, and everything has been very good, and I already knew that. And so what are some of the words of wisdom you want to leave with all the listeners to help people understand, because I heard a lot, and education is really close to me, and you’re right. You have to continue to learn to make yourself more valuable. People are just not looking because you come from a big school. It’s, what’s the value behind that? So what’re some words of wisdom you want to leave with the listeners?

 

Stedman:

The words of wisdom I would have for every single person, regardless of what color you are, what your gender is, where you came from, what your background is, good or bad, whatever the case may be, I would say that understand the value of knowledge of self. Know who you are. Know your strengths. Know your weaknesses. Develop an improvement process. Work on yourself at every level. That’s the piece. It’s an internal issue. And often we focus on the external issues to define our existence. And what I’ve learned from my own situation and being defined by my relationship and being defined by my race and being defined by my special needs brothers is that it’s not how the world defines you. It’s only how you define yourself that really matters. It took me a whole lifetime to learn that.

 

Alicia:

And that’s very important. I like that. It’s that internal. It’s internal. You have to see past external.

 

Stedman:

It’s internal, and it’s knowledge of self. So I spent all my time… How many books I’ve read on self-help to deal with the trauma and deal with the negativity, and to be able to deal with the foundation of my existence is negative. That means my energy is negative. And so the transformation for me, it’s always trying to be positive and focus on love as a way to see the glass half full, as opposed to half empty. That’s the transformation for me because the negative doesn’t go away. You think the negative goes away. It’s still there. What you have to do, what I learned more than anything else, is that you have to learn how to manage the negativity. You have to learn how to manage yourself. You have to learn how to manage the way that you speak to people, the way you should talk. You have to manage that.

 

Stedman:

And so you can manage that. You can learn how to manage your shortcomings so that you’re able to manage it, and it doesn’t manifest in the way that it hurts you. Because all of a sudden now, you want to say it just because you want to say it. You don’t have to say everything you think you want to say, because it doesn’t go away. And the law of attraction says, whatever you put out comes back. So if you don’t learn how to measure yourself in every area of your life, you’re going to be less valuable. That is just that, just compartmentalizing your life and being able to manage every single part of your life and develop a management program that allows you to be consistently on point. And then it becomes success becomes a journey over time when it becomes, what I’m looking for is consistency over long periods of time. It’s not short-term. It’s long-term. It’s not how you start the race. It’s how you… Y’all can finish that.

 

Alicia:

It’s how you endure.

 

Eileen:

It’s how you finish it.

 

Alicia:

It’s right.

 

Eileen:

It’s not a sprint. It’s a marathon.

 

Stedman:

Right. Anybody can start.

 

Alicia:

That’s right.

 

Stedman:

It’s not how you start.

 

Alicia:

It’s that endurance.

 

Stedman:

It’s how you finish.

 

Alicia:

Yes.

 

Eileen:

Wow. Thank you for those words of wisdom.

 

Alicia:

Yes.

 

Eileen:

We’re so happy, and we are so grateful.

 

Alicia:

I miss all those words of wisdom.

 

Eileen:

I love it. Choose love. Choose love.

 

Alicia:

Yes.

 

Stedman:

Choose love every time.

 

Eileen:

Thank you for joining us on the Soul of a Leader podcast. We are igniting a new way of leading with your soul and interviewing ordinary people with extraordinary impact.

 

Eileen:

Thank you for listening to the stories of our leaders who will help and guide you on your leadership journey.

 

Eileen:

For more information on our podcast, please visit our website at wwwsoulofaleader.com. Thank you for listening.

 

With Dr. Eileen & Dr. Alicia

Conversations with ordinary people, with extraordinary impact on strategies, success stories, spirituality and leadership.

With Dr. Eileen & Dr. Alicia

Conversations with ordinary people, with extraordinary impact on strategies, success stories, spirituality and leadership.